Hidden Figures

by Margot Lee Shetterly

I had been putting off going to see the much-talked-about film Hidden Figures until I finished reading the book, which with my full-time teaching position and my newly 10-year-old son, took longer than I expected.

I’m going to talk about the book here, after which I’ll see and report back on the movie.

The book Hidden Figures is the debut work of Margot Lee Shetterly, about the role African-American women mathematicians played in the United States Space race.

Carrie Fisher (1956-2016), Rocket Girl

The first time I ever stood in line for a movie was when I was eleven years old. I remember the line wrapping clear around Wilshire Blvd, and what seemed all the way down a block of Glendon Avenue in Westwood. My brother, then thirteen, and I waited for over an hour to see a new film called Star Wars. The film was terrifying — at least Darth Vader was. And thrilling. It would be many years later as an adult when I would actually understand a large chunk of the storyline, despite the confusing and uninspiring Revenge of the Sith and Attack of the Clones prequels. 

5 Ways to Re-engage Your Curiosity

My best advice for young people interested in pursuing a career in the sciences is to never lose your curiosity. Because curiosity, once lost, is difficult to reinvigorate — difficult, but not impossible. So, if you’re curiosity’s a little rusty, here are five ways to re-engage with it.

  1. Ask Questions

Questions are not just the byproduct of a curious mind, but also the root of curiosity. Even if you’re not curious, just the act of asking questions builds your curiosity muscle. Ask questions about anything and everything. When participating in a conversation, don’t be thinking of how to interject or respond, just listen to the person talking. Reaching answers or diagnoses too quickly dampens the inquiry process.