May 19

Can you name this important woman whose birthday is May 19?

Catherine ("Kate") Furbish (born May 19, 1834) was an American botanist who devoted her life to documenting, collecting, drawing and  carefully and accurately committing to watercolor the native flora of Maine.  She never married.  She donated her 16 folio volumes of watercolors to Bowdoin College, who recently published some of her collection: https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781442253766/Plants-and-Flowers-of-Maine-Kate-Furbish's-Watercolors.

Her large collection of dried plants went to the New England Botanical Club, which placed it in the Gray Herbarium at Harvard University, and her collection of ferns went to the Portland Society of Natural History. Two of her own botanical discoveries bear her name: Aster cordifolius L., var. furbishiae, and Pedicularis furbishiae, the Furbish lousewort.

The book Wildflowers of Maine documenting her work is set to be released in July 2017.

Sources:

Wikipedia

Encyclopedia Britannica

 

May 15

Can you name this important woman whose birthday is May 15?

Maria Reiche (born May 15, 1903) was a German mathematician, archaeologist and translator who spent the bulk of her life in Peru investigating and interpreting the Nazca Lines, a series of large geoglyphs in the Nazca Desert in southern Peru.  The figures extend approximately 50 miles and consist of hundreds of lines and geometric shapes and more than 70 animal and human shapes.  You can see the image of a whale above.

Reiche began her work as an assistant to Paul Kosok from the Long Island University in Brooklyn, New York, but continued on after he had left.

Most of the lines are made by removing the reddish-brown iron oxide-coated pebbles that cover the surface of the Nazca Desert. leaving a shallow trench 4 to 6 inches deep.  When this gravel is removed, the light-colored clay earth below is exposed which sharply contrasts the surrounding land surface.

It is most commonly accepted that these Nazca Lines had religious significance, though both Kosok and Reiche believed that they had astronomical purposes.

A children's book was written about Maria Reiche and her work: Maria and the Stars of Nazca.

Sources:

Wikipedia

New York Times obituary

 

May 12

Can you name all of these famous women who share the birthday May 12?

 

Dorothy Hodgkin (born May 12, 1910) was an English chemist and x-ray crystallographer who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1964 "for her determinations by X-ray techniques of the structures of important biochemical substances." She is mostly recognized as determining the structures of penicillin and vitamin B12.  She is the only English woman to have ever received a Nobel Prize in any of the three sciences. The Royal Society established the Dorothy Hodgkin fellowship to enable researchers in the early stages of their career to take time out to raise a family or care for a family member.  She is also the second woman in 60 years to have earned the Order of Merit by a king or queen.

Sources:

http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/chemistry/laureates/1964/hodgkin-facts.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothy_Hodgkin

 

Florence Nightingale (born May 12, 1820) was the first woman to have earned the Order of Merit by a king or queen.  She is recognized as the founder of modern nursing.  She professionalized and gave honor to the field of nursing, getting her start as a manager of nurses during the Crimean War.  She is known as the "lady with the lamp," making the rounds of the wounded soldiers at night.

Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Nightingale

 

Matilde Coxe Stevenson (born May 12, 1849) was an American ethnologist who, along with her anthropologist husband, spent 13 years studying the Rocky Mountain region.  She and her husband James Stevenson "formed the first husband-wife team in anthropology."  She became the first President of the Women's Anthropological Society of America.  Later on, she studied the cave, cliff and mesa ruins in New Mexico, as well as all of its Pueblo tribes.  She made a special study of the Taos and Tewa Native Americans.  The artifacts she collected are housed at the National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian.  Stevenson also published numerous books on the Zuni Native Americans.

Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matilda_Coxe_Stevenson

 

The Abduction of Lise Meitner

Lise Meitner had stayed too long. At the time, however, it didn’t seem that way. Thirty years had earned her the position as the head of the physics department at the Kaiser-Wilhelm Institute in Berlin, a level of scholarship and respect to which no woman before her had risen.

After all, growing up in Austria in the late 1800s, education was not deemed necessary or important to women past the age of 14. Women did not attend university — the local University of Vienna was in fact closed to women until 1897, when Lisa was already nineteen years old. Whereas the high school curriculum prepared boys to pass the Matura, or college entrance exams, women had no such preparation or entry point.

Lise, determined to enroll in the university, engaged a private tutor to pass the Matura.

Rozsa Peter (1905-1977)

Mathematician, Rocket Girl

Rozsa Peter was born on February 17, 1905 in Budapest, Hungary. Rozsa initially studied chemistry, but switched to mathematics. For 18 years after graduation, she had difficult securing a position, so she tutored and substitute taught at the high school level.  Peter earned her doctorate in 1935, and was known as one of the founders of recursive function theory.

Hidden Figures Inspires Us All to Try Harder

Hidden Figures had a powerful impact on me on me and I imagine so many others who have seen it. A story weaving together the historical narratives of the beginning of the United States space program, the civil rights movement and the emerging role of working women during and after World War II has so much deliciousness to work with, and Hidden Figures did it with aplomb.

It laid bare the injustices people “of color” fought against in the sixties without being heavy-handed. And it even showed how a handful of well-positioned white colleagues were able to see past color, and embolden these women to aim higher.

At a time when fewer women pursued college degrees, let alone higher degrees in math and science, when a woman’s place was either at home raising her children, or in the workplace as a secretary, sales associate or teacher, these black women defied norms to become NASA mathematicians, computer programmers and engineers.

Hidden Figures

by Margot Lee Shetterly

I had been putting off going to see the much-talked-about film Hidden Figures until I finished reading the book, which with my full-time teaching position and my newly 10-year-old son, took longer than I expected.

I’m going to talk about the book here, after which I’ll see and report back on the movie.

The book Hidden Figures is the debut work of Margot Lee Shetterly, about the role African-American women mathematicians played in the United States Space race.

Carrie Fisher (1956-2016), Rocket Girl

The first time I ever stood in line for a movie was when I was eleven years old. I remember the line wrapping clear around Wilshire Blvd, and what seemed all the way down a block of Glendon Avenue in Westwood. My brother, then thirteen, and I waited for over an hour to see a new film called Star Wars. The film was terrifying — at least Darth Vader was. And thrilling. It would be many years later as an adult when I would actually understand a large chunk of the storyline, despite the confusing and uninspiring Revenge of the Sith and Attack of the Clones prequels. 

5 Ways to Re-engage Your Curiosity

My best advice for young people interested in pursuing a career in the sciences is to never lose your curiosity. Because curiosity, once lost, is difficult to reinvigorate — difficult, but not impossible. So, if you’re curiosity’s a little rusty, here are five ways to re-engage with it.

  1. Ask Questions

Questions are not just the byproduct of a curious mind, but also the root of curiosity. Even if you’re not curious, just the act of asking questions builds your curiosity muscle. Ask questions about anything and everything. When participating in a conversation, don’t be thinking of how to interject or respond, just listen to the person talking. Reaching answers or diagnoses too quickly dampens the inquiry process.

Ask Better Questions

“My mother made me a scientist without ever intending to. Every other Jewish mother in Brooklyn would ask her child after school: So? Did you learn anything today? But not my mother. ‘Izzy,’ she would say, ‘did you ask a good question today?’ That difference — asking good questions — made me become a scientist.” - Isidor Rabi, Nobel Prize Winning Physicist

Curiosity is the first and most important quality of a Rocket Girl. Curious people want to find out “Why.” Rocket Girls, like all good scientists, never stop asking questions.